WAR IS PERSONAL

WAR IS PERSONAL

Publisher:  Many Voices Press
Language: English
 

Photography: Eugene Richards
Story Research and Text Editing: Janine Altongy
Design Assistance: Sam Richards

 
By early 2006, the war in Iraq was entering its fourth year. No weapons of mass destruction had been found. Tens of thousands of Iraqis were reported injured and dead, more than two thousand American soldiers had been killed, and rates of depression and suicide were rising among American military personnel. Yet all the while, Congress and the media debated what the conflict was costing America in image and treasure, and costing the president in popularity. Troubled by the public’s growing indifference to the ongoing horrors in Iraq and critical of his own inaction, acclaimed photographer Eugene Richards began documenting the lives of Americans who had been profoundly affected by the Iraq war.

Bold and epic in scope, War Is Personal is a compilation of fifteen real-life stories that speak of what it means to go to war, to sacrifice, to wait, to hope, to mourn, to remember, to live on when those you love are gone. With heartbreaking photographs and texts, Richards records the funeral of twenty-two-year-old Army sergeant Princess Samuels and profiles veterans such as Tomas Young, who was shot in the spine and paralyzed four days into his tour in Iraq. Richards documents parents such as Carlos Arredondo, who grew so distraught upon hearing of his son’s death in combat that he attacked and destroyed a Marine Corps van, severely injuring himself, and Nelida Bagley, whose massively brain-injured son requires nearly round-the-clock care. Uncompromising and sure to be controversial, War Is Personal is a study of lives in upheaval and a chronicle of greatly differing attitudes, experiences, and understandings of what it means for Americans to go to war.

NEIGHBORS/NACHBARN

NEIGHBORS/NACHBARN

Publisher: steidlMACK
Language: –
 

Photography: Collier Schorr
Design: –
Essays: –

 
The American photographer Collier Schorr has been working in Southern Germany for the past 12 years, compiling a documentary and fictional portrait of a small town inhabited by historical apparitions. For Schorr, the German landscape is a map of her own history, both imagined and inherited. Combining the overlapping roles of war photographer, traveling portraitist, anthropologist and family historian, the series Forest and Fields (Wald und Wiesen) tells the interwoven stories of a place and time determined by memory, nationalism, war, emigration and family. Forests and Fields is intrinsically about book making, an ongoing suite of artist’s books that utilizes traditional notions of category to create different points of view. Each volume is part diary, photo-annual, palimpsest, and scrapbook, and involves a process which constantly expands and contradicts the artist’s oeuvre through re-edits of the work to create new views through the material. The first two volumes will focus on Neighbors and Reportage. Subsequent volumes will include landscapes, architecture, flowers and sport. Each volume will share the same dimensions but each will be designed as an independent and unique work in itself. The final volume will be text based, a collection of commissioned and re-published writings inspired by the ideas explored in the pictures.

CHICAGO

CHICAGO

Publisher: steidlMACK
Language: English
 
Photography: Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin
Design: Catherine Lutman
Essay: Eyal Weizman
 
 
Everything that happened, happened here first, in rehearsal.
The invasion of Beirut, the first and second Intifada, the Gaza withdrawal, an attempted assassination of Saddam Hussein, the Battle of Falluja; almost every one of Israel’s major military tactics in the Middle East over the past three decades was performed in advance in Chicago, an artificial but realistic Arab town built by the Israeli Defense Force in the middle of the Negev desert for urban combat training.
 
Broomberg and Chanarin offer an original visual analysis of contemporary Israel beginning in Chicago and ending in a sniper’s lair. Nothing in this book is what it seems. A watermelon is revealed to be a suicide bomb; a tranquil forest becomes the site of a forensic investigation; a pastoral landscape becomes a warzone. Through this collection of simulated landscapes, buildings and objects, a new perspective on Israel begins to emerge.

AFGHANISTAN: CHRONOTOPIA

AFGHANISTAN: CHRONOTOPIA

Publisher:  Dewi Lewis Pub, 2002
Italian edition: Peliti Associati
Language: English
 

Photography and text: Simon Norfolk
Design: Jonathan Towell

 
European art has long had a fondness for ruin and desolation that has little parallel in other cultures. Since the Renaissance, artists such as Claude Lorraine or Caspar David Friedrich have painted destroyed classical palaces and gothic churches, bathed in a fading golden twilight. These motifs symbolised that the greatest creations of civilisation – the empires of Rome and Greece or the Catholic Church – even these have no permanence. Eventually they too would crumble; vanquished by barbarians and vanishing into the undergrowth. The only thing that could last, that was truly reliable, was God. And man’s only rational response in the face of God’s power, was awe. The landscapes of Afghanistan are also ‘awesome’ (in the original sense of this word) but the feelings of dread and insignificance are not related to the power of God but to the power of modern weaponry.
 

Afghanistan is unique, utterly unlike any other war-ravaged landscape. In Bosnia, Dresden or the Somme for example, the devastation appears to have taken place within one period, inflicted by a small gamut of weaponry. However, the sheer length of the war in Afghanistan, means that the ruins have a bizarre layering; different moments of destruction lying like sedimentary strata on top of each other. There are places near Bagram Air Base or on The Shomali Plain where the front line has passed back and forth eight or nine times – each leaving a deadly flotsam of destroyed homes and fields seeded with landmines. A parallel is the story of Heinrich Schliemann’s discovery of the remains of the classical city of Troy in the 1870s. Digging down, he found eleven cities deposited upon each other, each one in its turn rebuilt upon the rubble of its predecessor and later destroyed. 

Continue on: https://www.simonnorfolk.com/afghanistan-chronotopia